Skip to main content

About your Search

20121210
20121210
STATION
CNBC 3
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3
CNBC
Dec 10, 2012 5:00pm EST
is scheduled to go to his hawaii vacation, which will cost taxpayers $4 million. >> according to the hawaii reporter. >> the other bookmark is his inauguration. you don't want these things to go through the inauguration, either. so, that gives us a very tight window. >> look, politicians have a long track record of kicking the can down the road. they could certainly do it again. but i've characterized this bull market as sort of the rodney dangerfield of bull markets. absolutely no respect. and it just keeps climbing this wall of worry, as the old adage goes. >> talk a little bit about earnings and the things you are covering, health care, financials. >> certainly. >> how do you think earnings are going to shape up for 2013? >> i'm optimistic. we could see $110 for the s&p 500. the multiple right now is about 12 1/2. we get down to 12, 13 seems to be unlucky. we can't seem to break through that. but if we get through this cliff issue, and we will, one way or another, even if we go over the cliff, there will be some resolution afterwards. i think earnings are going to hang in there pretty we
CNBC
Dec 10, 2012 1:00pm EST
the most category? taking into account mortgage size and income. borrows in hawaii and washington, d.c. get the greatest benefit. from 3 to 5%. california hard hit, losing that reduction could hurt a lot. talking about hard hit, take a look at arizona, nevada and florida. does that really affect home buying when the bulk of buyers in those states are investors who don't use mortgages? the answer, probably not. now i want it highlight new york and new jersey. they are on the high end of what you get from the tax benefit. and they desperately need buyers. two states have huge foreclosure backlogs. they need brisk buy flg order to eat up that distress. we want to keep that in perspective. people say taking away this deduction will raise home prices and drop purchasing power. but we have to remember that the interest deduction is used by 27% of borrowers. what is interesting is that older americans are getting hit with it more because they usually would move out of their large homes by now and they today stay in place because they weren't able to sell during the housing crash. guys? >> diana, d
CNBC
Dec 10, 2012 9:00am EST
saved on at least $2,000 with this deduction. on the flip side, borrowers in washington, d.c., hawaii and california, they're getting the biggest tax benefit in the $3,000 to $4,000 range. new york and new jersey are also way up there, thanks to high home values and income. and i'm noting them because these two states need home buyers, desperately. they have some of the biggest backlogs of distressed properties and need buyers in there absorbing that distress. taking away the deduction takes away one more reason to buy. $2,000 to $5,000 a year is a big savings. but we have to keep this in perspective. you only get the deduction if you itemize an only about one-third of americans do itemize. just 27% taking the deduction. and i want to note one other thing, older americans, 54% of families ages 55 to 64 are carrying mortgage debt. that's way up from 37% in 1989, because during the housing crash they were unable to move. so that's going to hit them hard as well. especially for the next several years. melissa? >> some very interesting figures. diana, thanks for that report. back at headq
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3